HOW TO IDENTIFY BIRD FLU SYMPTOMS IN CHICKENS

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HOW TO IDENTIFY BIRD FLU SYMPTOMS IN CHICKENS

 

Now more than ever it’s imperative that farmers start to identify bird flu symptoms in chickens and other poultry.

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Avian influenza Type A viruses occur naturally among wild aquatic birds and can spread to domestic poultry flocks. The effects can be deadly and expensive. Identifying early bird flu symptoms in chickens offers the chance to mitigate the negative effects often felt by farmers and their constituents.

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Bird Flu Symptoms in Chickens

Avian flu can spread quickly and negatively affect the health of chickens within hours. In severe cases, chickens can die within a day.

READ ALSO: HOW TO MANAGE SYMPTOMS OF POULTRY STRESS IN BROILER CHICKENS

Common bird flu symptoms in chickens include:

Edema in the comb and wattles

Purple discoloration / cyanosis of the wattles, combs, and legs

Diarrhea

Nasal discharge

Soft-shelled or misshapen eggs

Decreased egg production

Coughing and sneezing

Lack of coordination

Swelling of the head, eyelids, wattles, hocks, and comb

Lack of energy and appetite

Pinpoint hemorrhages on feet and shanks

Ruffled feathers

Any one of these symptoms can indicate the presence of avian flu in your flock, in addition to sudden death that comes without warning signs.

 

Recognizing Bird Flu Symptoms in Humans

Although it’s rare for humans to contract avian flu, it can happen. Symptoms such as fever, coughing, sore throat, muscle aches, and conjunctivitis may result from infection. In more serious cases pneumonia and acute respiratory distress can occur.

 

Additional symptoms:

Difficulty breathing

Diarrhea

Abdominal pain

Vomiting

Neurologic changes

Dealing with Recent Outbreaks

Due to the recent outbreaks, farmers and poultry producers should be on high-alert and take extra precautions to avoid flock infection. There are two main ways avian flu is spread:

READ ALSO: The Right Minerals For Improving Shell Quality and Egg Quantity 

Through migratory birds

By human interaction

Wild migratory flocks, such as geese and ducks, can become infected with avian influenza and quickly spread it to poultry flocks across the nation.

 

Taking preventative measures:

Have flocks tested

Thoroughly clean all equipment and transportation vehicles used to move poultry and clean habitats

Closely monitor flock behavior, appearance, and appetite

Limit access to flocks to only the necessary personnel

Cutoff flock access to outside contact with wild birds

Isolate flocks that show signs of infection for at least 30 days

Do not borrow or use equipment from other poultry farms

Report bird flu symptoms in poultry to the government Veterinary Health Authority

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